Yearly Archives: 2017

Hire me!

tl;dr: I’ve recently moved to the San Francisco Bay Area, received my US Work Authorization, so now I’m looking for somewhere  to work. I have a résumé and an e-mail address!

I’ve worked a lot in Free and Open Source Software communities over the last five years, both in Australia and overseas. While much of my focus has been on the Python community, I’ve also worked more broadly in the Open Source world. I’ve been doing this community work entirely as a volunteer, most of the time working in full-time software engineering jobs which haven’t related to my work in the Open Source world.

It’s pretty clear that I want to move into a job where I can use the skills I’ve been volunteering for the last few years, and put them to good use both for my company, and for the communities I serve.

What I’m interested in doing fits best into a developer advocacy or community management sort of role. Working full-time on helping people in tech be better at what they do would be just wonderful. That said, my background is in code, and working in software engineering with a like-minded company would also be pretty exciting (better still if I get to write a lot of Python).

  • Something with a strong developer relations element. I enjoy working with other developers, and I love having the opportunity to get them excited about things that I’m excited about. As a conference organiser, I’m very aware of the line between terrible marketing shilling, and genuine advocacy by and for developers: I want to help whoever I work for end up on the right side of that line.
  • Either in San Francisco, North of San Francisco, or Remote-Friendly. I live in Petaluma, a lovely town about 50 minutes north of San Francisco, with my wonderful partner, Josh. We’re pretty happy up here, but I’m happy to regularly commute as far as San Francisco. I’ll consider opportunities in other cities, but they’d need to primarily be remote.
  • Relevant to Open Source. The Open Source world is where my experience is, it’s where I know people, and it’s the world where I can be most credible. This doesn’t mean I need to be working on open source itself, but I’d love to be able to show up at OSCON or linux.conf.au and be excited to have my company’s name on my badge.

Why would I be good at this? I’ve been working on building and interacting with communities of developers, especially in the Free and Open Source Software world, for the last five years.

You can find a complete list of what I’ve done in my résumé, but here’s a selection of what I think’s notable:

  • Co-organised two editions of PyCon Australia, and led the linux.conf.au 2017 team. I’ve led PyCon AU, from inception, to bidding, to the successful execution for two years in a row. As the public face of PyCon AU, I made sure that the conference had the right people interested in speaking, and that we had many from Australian Python community interested in attending. I took what I learned at PyCon AU and applied it to run linux.conf.au 2017, where our CFP attracted its largest ever response (beating the previous record by more than 30%).
  • Developed Registrasion, an open source conference ticket system. I designed and developed a ticket sales system that allowed for automation of the most significant time sinks that linux.conf.au and PyCon Australia registration staff had experienced in previous years. Registrasion was Open Sourced, and several other conferences are considering adopting it.
  • Given talks at countless open source and developer events, both in Australia, and overseas. I’ve presented at OSCON, PyCons in five countries, and myriad other conferences. I’ve presented on a whole lot of technical topics, and I’ve recently started talking more about the community-level projects I’ve been involved with.
  • Designed, ran, and grew PyCon Australia’s outreach and inclusion programmes. Each year, PyCon Australia has offered upwards of $10,000 (around 10% of conference budget) in grants to people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to attend the conference: this is not just speakers, but people whose presence would improve the conference just by being there. I’ve led a team to assess applications for these grants, and lead our outreach efforts to make sure we find the right people to receive these grants.
  • Served as a council member for Linux Australia. Linux Australia is the peak body for Open Source communities in Australia, as well as underwriting the region’s more popular Open Source and Developer conferences. In particular, I led a project to design governance policies to help make sure the conferences we underwrite are properly budgeted and planned.

So, if you know of anything going at the moment, I’d love to hear about it. I’m reachable by e-mail (mail@chrisjrn.com) but you can also find me on Twitter (@chrisjrn), or if you really need to, LinkedIn.

Two Weeks’ Notice

Last week, a rather heavy document envelope showed up in the mail.

Inside I found a heavy buff-coloured envelope, along with my passport — now containing a sticker featuring an impressive collection of words, numbers, and imagery of landmarks from the United States of America. I’m reliably informed that sticker is the valid US visa that I’ve spent the last few months applying for.

Having that visa issued has unblocked a fairly important step in my path to moving in with Josh (as well as eventually getting married, but that’s another story). I’m very very excited about making the move, though very sad to be leaving the city I’ve grown up in and come to love, for the time being.

Unrelatedly, I happened to have a trip planned to Montréal to attend ConFoo in March. Since I’ll already be in the area, I’m using that trip as my opportunity to move.

My last day in Hobart will be Thursday 2 March. Following that, I’ll be spending a day in Abu Dhabi (yes, there is a good reason for this), followed by a week in Montréal for ConFoo.

After that, I’ll be moving in with Josh in Petaluma, California on Saturday 11 March.

But until then, I definitely want to enjoy what remaining time I have in Hobart, and catch up with many many people.

Over the next two weeks I’ll be:

  • Attending, and presenting a talk at WD42 — my talk will be one of my pieces for ConFoo, and is entirely new material. Get along!
  • Having a farewell do, *probably* on Tuesday 28 February (but that’s not confirmed yet). I’ll post details about where and when that’ll be in the near future (once I’ve made plans)
  • Madly packing and making sure that that I use up as close to 100% of my luggage allowance as possible

If you want to find some time to catch up over the next couple of weeks, before I disappear for quite some time, do let me know.

My 2016 Highlights

2016 was, undeniably, a length of time containing 366 days and a leap second.

For me, there were a bunch of highlights that it would be amiss to let pass without recording on this blog, so here goes:

  • At linux.conf.au 2016 in Geelong in February, I announced linux.conf.au 2017 in Hobart. Over the last year, the conference team and I ran a wildly successful CFP, found 4 amazing keynotes, and lined up what looks like it should be an excellent conference. The only* thing left to do is actually run the thing.
  • At PyCon in Montréal in 2014, I ran a BoF session for regional PyCon organisers. Two people from the Dominican Republic showed up and asked for our help in starting a PyCon in the Caribbean. In February 2016, I got to go to that conference, and it was incredible!
  • On that note, I got to continue building on a deeply wonderful relationship with the amazing Josh Simmons that we started in 2015. Over the course of 2016, we got to spend time with each other on no fewer than 6 occasions, both in North America, and here in Australia. We met (and got along quite well with) each others’ friends and families. We spent time living together, and have made big steps towards living together permanently this year. Frankly, I could do a whole post on this and I’m not sure why I haven’t.
  • On a slightly related note, I spent 92,000-odd miles in the air this year. Much of that was spent ducking over to the US to spend time with Josh; some of the rest was with Josh, and some of it was alone. I got to see some wonderful places I’ve never seen before, like the Grand Canyon and Hoover Dam, an actual northern hemisphere winter with snow and everything, and driving up the Californian coast from Los Angeles.
  • … and one night in May, on the Steel Bridge in Portland, Josh and I decided that we should get married.Chris and Josh on the Steel Bridge

So those are some of the highlights of my year. It’s been entirely not bad, in the grand scheme of things. Hooray!